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BEZOAR  STONES

287

the town of Middelburg in Holland; it was purchased and pre-
sented to the Emperor of Germany. Gesner gives a curious figure

of it, representing the animal as a comparatively colossal beast
submitting itself to the guidance of a dwarfish man. The habit of
" spitting ** of the ILama is well known. An gust in de Zarate and
Billion speak of the I^ama as having no protection save tins habit,
which is more than a mere ejection of saliva : the contents of the

FIG. 149, — Lama.

, hitanacos

stomach are forcibly shot at the object of its annoyance. It can
also kick and bite. In. the intestines (as in those of some other
mammals) are found Bezoar stones, or Bezards as they are variously
spelt. These were once valued in medicine, and even so lately as
1847 were, according to Gay, the historian of Chili, in vogue;
these concretions, comparable to the ambergris of the Whales, were
supposed to be an antidote to poison.

Extinct   Camels, — The  earliest  cumeloid  type is the  genus
of which we  are acquainted with an imperfect skull

* So© •Wortxnaa, BuU.

Jfus, Wat, JEfiW. x. 1898, p.